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11151 Sun Center Drive Suite C

Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

Phone: 916-273-3389

Fax: 916-930-6475

Email: Info@MsRosesTheraPlace.com

© 2016 Ms. Rose's TheraPlace

Proud member of the Happy Neighborhood Project.

Race to the Top-Equity and Opportunity

April 14, 2017

Everyone's role in the education with respect to not being racially biased is so crucial for our young Native American, Black, and Latino boys and teens. This is where it starts.

 

 

"Every data point represents a life impacted and a future potentially diverted or derailed. This Administration is moving aggressively to disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline in order to ensure that all of our young people have equal educational opportunities." 

 

"This rich information allows us to identify gaps and cases of discrimination to partner with states and districts to ensure equal access to educational opportunities," said Catherine E. Lhamon, assistant secretary for civil rights. "From Native American tribal nations to inner city barrios, all of our children deserve a high quality education."

Among the key findings:

  • Access to preschool. About 40% of public school districts do not offer preschool, and where it is available, it is mostly part-day only. Of the school districts that operate public preschool programs, barely half are available to all students within the district.

     

     

  • Suspension of preschool children. Black students represent 18% of preschool enrollment but 42% of students suspended once, and 48% of the students suspended more than once.

 

  • Access to advanced courses. Eighty-one percent (81%) of Asian-American high school students and 71% of white high school students attend high schools where the full range of math and science courses are offered (Algebra I, geometry, Algebra II, calculus, biology, chemistry, physics). However, less than half of American Indian and Native-Alaskan high school students have access to the full range of math and science courses in their high school. Black students (57%), Latino students (67%), students with disabilities (63%), and English language learner students (65%) also have less access to the full range of courses.

 

  • Access to college counselors. Nationwide, one in five high schools lacks a school counselor; in Florida and Minnesota, more than two in five students lack access to a school counselor.

 

  • Retention of English learners in high school. English learners make up 5% of high school enrollment but 11% of high school students held back each year.

Read the full article on the Department of Education's website Expansive Survey of America's Public Schools Reveals Troubling Racial Disparities.

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